Elysium…Heaven on Earth…The Antarctic

This time last year I was in South America on my way to The Antarctic.

I can’t believe nearly a year has past since my trip of a lifetime..

I think about The Antarctic everyday…

The vivid blue colour of the ice, the wildlife and the beautiful feeling of visiting such a remote, isolated part of our planet.

My exhibition, Frozen Lenses was a huge success for me last year..dates will be released soon for venues in 2014

These are some of my favourite pics…

If you have any questions or comments about these photos, I’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

Click on the first pic to view all the pics as a slideshow.

Chris 🙂

Jagged Edge – a pic from the Antarctic

A couple of weekends ago i met a woman, Margret, who wanted to buy one of my images from my exhibition, Frozen Lenses.

Today I delivered that image to her and as well as having an early lunch with her and a glass of wine (at 11am) I learnt a lot about perception.

Without her knowing the name of the image, this is what she told me it meant to her.

“From the original grandiose shape I can see the beauty evolving and how years of living leaves characteristic marks. In the deterioration process the wild jagged edges look like the deep folds in an old persons face or body”

What a beautiful way to describe my image. She told me those words were a reflection of how she felt about herself. I can’t believe she used the words ‘jagged edge’ – that is what I named my image within minutes of shooting it.

I told her I had a completely different slant on it.

“I spotted this iceberg from far away, it looked wild, yet alone and incomplete. As we approached it I saw the beauty and imperfection in its shape. It totally reminded me of me – wild with jagged edges.

What are your thoughts on this image? I’d love to hear them. Please leave your comments below.

Enjoy my image – Jagged Edge.Jagged Edge

Shackleton – the documentary of one of the greatest journeys of all time

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Sir Ernest Shackleton

OH MY GOD…

I’ve just finished watching Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure – a documentary film of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s now-legendary 1914-1916 British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. He wanted to be the first man to cross the Antarctic continent on foot.

He never fulfilled this dream. What he did do though was embed his name forever into the history books.

Through sheer perseverance and a determination that made him unique, he and his crew experienced conditions that any man would shy away from.

He watched his beloved ship ‘Endurance’ be crushed by ice, camped on ice floes under horrific conditions, spent many days at sea in life boats with his crew, and perhaps the most incredible part of this journey, he and 5 other men rowed 800 miles from Elephant Island to South Georgia.

This is the part I can’t believe. They rowed in the lifeboat, the James Caird, across the worlds most dangerous ocean, experienced gale force winds, treacherous seas and freezing, wet conditions.

All with the hope and belief that he could accomplish this formidable task.

They eventually made it to South Georgia. They unfortunately landed on the opposite side to the whaling station, so Shackleton and two others walked the 30 miles across South Georgia, with leather boots, 2 compasses, an axe and an old rope. They walked non-stop for 36 hours over dangerous crevasses, formidable peaks and complicated land. They eventually reached their destination – an unbelievable feat.

This is a story of courage, perseverance, hope and the human spirit. This heroic adventurer had eternal optimism, unequalled leadership qualities and believed anything could be accomplished. This caring gentle man nurtured his crew like they were his own family.

This really is one of the greatest journeys of all time….watch this film (click on the link below) and please let me know what you think of the film in the comments below.

Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure

Chill out…you’ve got two more weeks to see it….

Hi everyone,

We’ve just received some really great news 🙂

Jad and Milton, the owners of Societe Food & Wine Bar – 1/9-15 Danks Street Waterloo have told us that our Antarctic exhibition – Frozen Lenses, is the ‘best, most professional exhibition we’ve ever had at the cafe.’

And as there are lots and lots of people continuing to visit the cafe to view our photos, could we possibly leave the exhibition up for another two weeks?

Ummm….Okay….

so…..

FROZEN LENSES – our photographic journey to the Antarctic is showing for another TWO WEEKS till 14th July at Societe Food & Wine Bar – 1/9-15 Danks Street Waterloo.

How cool is that?  (sorry)

Ok, so as I’m all fired up about the ANTARCTIC, here are some of the coolest facts (sorry again:)

1.The lowest recorded Antarctic temperature of -89.2 C was at the the Russian Research Station, Vostok on 21st July, 1983…

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– When I went to the Antarctic, I wore clothes made from state of the art breathable fabrics that were warm, windproof and, most importantly, kept me dry. Early Antartic explorers wore heavy woollen fabrics and outer layers that would soak up the moisture produced by sweat.

Getting dressed in the morning would often involve putting on outfits that were FROZEN SOLID with ice in the fabric. The garment would gradually become more flexible as it warmed up.

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– Antarctica is the highest, driest, windiest, coldest place on earth.

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– Shackleton’s Hut is situated at Cape Royds, Ross Island and was constructed by Shackleton and nine of his crew in 1908. They spent an entire year in this hut during his 1907-1909 expedition. Today it still holds over 5000 items including cuff links, darned trousers, a jar of gherkins, penguin eggs, seal blubber, books and canned food which have all been preserved by the cold weather.

Google has recently taken some fisheye photographs and created a 360 degree panoramic photograph of the hut.

To view inside Shackleton’s hut, click on the map below. You can use the navigator on the top left, or I find it easier to click the mouse anywhere on the map and drag the photo to view. You can also make the map bigger by clicking on the top right corner. Spend some time really looking at the provisions. It’s as though time has stood still…absolutely fascinating!!!

 – At the beginning of winter, the Antarctic sea ice advances by approximately 100,000 square kilometres PER DAY, and eventually doubles the size of Antarctica, adding up to an extra 20 million square kilometres of ice around the land mass. WOW! That’s approximately double the size of Australia’s land mass. This ice then breaks up and melts each year. Unbelievable.

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Photo:Nasa

Australian Antarctic Division; Dome A; 21st May 2013, accessed 2nd July 2013 < http://www.antarctica.gov.au/living-and-working/stations/other-locations/dome-a&gt;

Antarctica and that blue, blue ice

I’ve just returned from Antarctica. I saw many breathtaking scenes that I am still dreaming about.

But the real reason I went there was the icebergs. I’ve always been fascinated by them and they were initially what lured me to Antarctica.

Well I certainly got my dose of those. 100’s of them – large and small – they were all spectacular.

I particularly loved the larger ones – such tall, powerful structures that drift in the peaceful stillness of the waters of the 5th largest continent.

I couldn’t keep my eyes off them. Being down low in the zodiac, it felt very surreal, as if I was in another world and at one with the ice.

Its almost as if time has forgotten them.

Why are some of the icebergs blue? Well its really all about compression of the ice and the colour spectrum.

Icebergs come from glaciers, which are formed by continual ice and snow. Snowflakes (frozen water) form and then become cystalized. A snowflake is a multi faceted crystal and these facets reflect light. As snow accumulates on the glacier huge amounts of air is trapped.

The blue colour occurs in ice that is generally hundred’s to thousand’s of years old. Continual compression as the glacier moves and heads towards the sea plus the continual thawing and refreezing of the ice causes the air that was originally trapped by the falling snow to be expelled. The ability to reflect light (and therefore appear white ) only exists when there is air trapped between the snow crystals. This very old, very dense ice is no longer capable of reflecting light .

Light that now hits the iceberg no longer reflects off it, it is absorbed by it. The weaker wavelengths of light are quickly filtered out (red, orange, yellow, green.) The blue wavelength has enough energy to reflect from, or penetrate deep within the iceberg therefore giving it that gorgeous blue colour……

Cool huh? 🙂

These photos were taken at Cierva Cove, Antarctica. 64.16S 60.89W. Don’t forget to click on the photos to enlarge them…

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