Time is running out for LISA FOLINO’S campaign to exhibit her photography in Venice! HELP!!!!

Do you remember my last blog post about my friend LISA FOLINO the FINE ART photographer? Lisa has been given an incredible opportunity to exhibit her work at the largest international art platform, The 2017 Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy.
We have been running a crowdfunding campaign on Hatchfund to help Lisa realise her lifelong dream.
We are in the final stages of the campaign and at this time, Lisa hasn’t met her goal. 😦 It takes a lot to ask a friend or acquaintance for help, but I really want to help Lisa make this journey to Venice – so I’m going to ask anyway 🙂

We are holding a raffle – tickets are $10 each – and you can purchase as many as you want. If we sell a minimum of 200 tickets, someone will be chosen to win one of Lisa’s prints.

Just imagine – you could have one of these awesome pieces of fine art photography in YOUR home!!!

All you have to do is:

1.Visit https://www.hatchfund.org/project/grace_and_truth and chose your donation level.

For example, if you donate $50 you’ll have 5 tickets in the raffle, $100 you’ll have 10 tickets, $10 you’ll have one ticket.

2. Come back here to this blog post and in the comments below tell me YOUR NAME and YOUR DONATION AMOUNT. The raffle will be drawn Friday night 4/28/17 at approx 8pm.

3. Remember, if you choose to support this campaign in any way, you will receive a CHARITABLE RECEIPT.

4. This is TIME SENSITIVE – this campaign finishes later on this week at MIDNIGHT FRIDAY 28TH APRIL.

To donate please visit:
https://www.hatchfund.org/project/grace_and_truth 
To see an animated video of the complete portfolio please click here.
I really appreciate you taking the time to read this blog post, if you have any questions please contact me at bernasconiphotography@gmail.com 
Thanks everyone,
Chris 🙂

My talented friend is exhibiting her photography in Venice and needs OUR help

I love photography – I love the way different people ‘see’ and express their views and feelings through their photography.

Let me introduce my beautiful friend Lisa Folino to you. She is a fine art photographer based in Los Angeles and creates some seriously beautiful work.

It has been a lifelong dream of hers to exhibit in the oldest and most prestigious art fair in the world – The Venice Biennale.

As fate would have it, a couple of months back, she received an exclusive invitation to exhibit her work in the Biennale.

Exhibits in this art fair reach over 300,000 people over a six-month period. Lisa’s participation in the Biennale opens the opportunity to expand her cultural reach globally.

An exhibition of this size and scale is WAY BEYOND her financial means, therefore I am asking you to ‘HELP ME TO HELP HER’ to get to Venice…

ANY DONATION would be greatly appreciated – no matter what size.

To read more about this campaign AND DONATE please visit http://www.hatchfund.org/project/grace_and_truth

To see more of Lisa’s work visit https://www.lisafolino.com/

To learn more about the Biennale visit http://www.labiennale.org

Lisa is offering great ‘perks’ for all donations and support levels start from just $10 through to $15,000.

All support is tax deductible.

Thanks everyone for helping me to help a very talented fellow photographer 🙂

 

First Prize in the ‘Urban Landscape’ Section – Sydney Royal Easter Show

What a wonderful week its been for me…

I took out first prize in the ‘Urban Landscape’ section of the Sydney Royal Easter Show photography competition with a shot of our iconic Sydney Opera House…

And boy am I chuffed 🙂

There were so many wonderful photographs, congratulations to all the other winners.

Have a great weekend everyone 🙂

 

 

The FANTASTIC Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens

I’ve just returned from a month in the Arctic {more about that later – and yes, it was sensational.}

I added a couple of new lenses to my kit before going away, one of them being the sensational Sigma 150-600mm F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens.

I hired the previous model of this lens when I visited the Antarctic a couple of years back and overall wasn’t very happy with the sharpness of the lens. Everything on the latest model – Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens – has improved significantly, especially the image sharpness. I am ecstatic with the results 🙂

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Here’s the rundown:

Overall build and cost

The build of the lens is SUPER SOLID and is very well designed. It retails for around $2245 AUD and at this price, it makes a very welcome addition to your kit.

The 150 to 600mm sports lens is heavier than most of the opposition. Weighing in at 2.860kg, this is not a lens that you want to hand hold for long periods of time. I used a monopod whilst we were on the land. In the zodiacs, I either stood up or sat and used my elbow and the side of the zodiac to take the weight of the lens.

The lens features dust and splash proof construction and a water & oil repellent coating on the front and rear glass elements of the lens.

The lens is packed in a very substantial padded carrying case and features a VERY SOLID LENS HOOD which offers great protection to the front of the lens {especially with rain, splash and general knocks etc.} and can be reversed over the barrel for transportation. The overall length of the lens {with the hood reversed} is 121.9 x 289.6mm. This lens fitted easily into my Lowepro Pro Runner RL x450 AW rolling camera bag.

With the lens zoomed to 600mm and the hood attached, the entire lens grows to 480mm in length {be prepared for lens envy.}

The filter size is 105mm {not many suppliers will stock this size.} I had to really hunt around to source the UV filter for this lens.

This lens is available in a Canon, Nikon and Sigma mount.

The only annoying aspect of this lens was for some reason Sigma didn’t supply a lens cap? I purchased one direct from Sigma for $20AUD.

Focal Length

At 150mm to 600mm, this lens suits wildlife, distant landscapes, street scenes, sports photography and more. I could capture a complete iceberg at 150mm {as they were a fair distance away.} However, I used the lens at 600mm for most of the trip to photograph wildlife and closeups of icebergs and mountains.

Aperture range

F5-6.3 to F22. This lens has a ‘variable max aperture’ which means that wide open aperture exposure settings will change as the lens is zoomed from 150mm to longer focal lengths.

Image sharpness

Using the lens at 600mm required faster shutter speeds to deliver sharp hand held results. At times I used a monopod, but most shots were taken in a moving zodiac, standing up, with the lens at full 600mm zoom.

The lens has ‘image stabilization’ but I did find I had to increase the ISO to obtain a fast shutter speed to freeze the action. The results were fantastic. 9 out of 10 shots were ABSOLUTELY TACK SHARP.

Take a look at these shots for sharpness!!

It was easy to photograph this harbour seal at 600mm. He hardly knew I was there. F6.3 1/320 sec ISO 1250
It was easy to photograph this harbour seal at 600mm. He hardly knew I was there. F6.3 1/320 sec ISO 1250.
Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 10.48.22 am
Now for a close up of the whiskers 🙂 Super sharp huh?
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And the eye…again, tack sharp.
Here's an iceberg in Greenland. Taken from a moving zodiac. Focal length 600mm. F11 1/2000 sec ISO 640.
Here’s an iceberg in Greenland. Taken from a moving zodiac. Focal length 600mm. F11 1/2000 sec ISO 640.
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Now, lets zoom in…still sharp!
This shot was taken on a research station near Longyearbyen, Svalbard. Note where the weather station is :) F8 1/250 sec ISO 200.
This shot was taken on a research station near Longyearbyen, Svalbard. Note where the weather station is 🙂 F8 1/250 sec ISO 200.
Here's the weather station taken at 600mm on the Sigma lens. F8 1/1000 sec ISO 400.
Here’s the weather station taken at 600mm on the Sigma lens. F8 1/1000 sec ISO 400.
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This is the zoomed in shot..Super sharp!

Conclusion

If you are looking for a SUPER SHARP, AFFORDABLE telephoto lens – then this is the lens for you. Yes, it’s heavy {always use a tripod or monopod and you’ll be fine} but the IMAGE SHARPNESS is the real WINNER.

I am super impressed! Rush out and buy it now. Right now 🙂

If you have any questions about this lens, please email me at bernasconiphotography@gmail.com 🙂

 

 

Not sure what to do on a rainy Saturday in Sydney? Read this….

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Yep, it’s a rainy Saturday in Sydney. The click.walk.learn tour of The Rocks that was scheduled for today has been postponed due to the unpredictability of this weather!

So are you looking for something to do today that still fits in around ‘photography?’

There are a few awesome photography exhibitions on in Sydney at the moment..

Head to the Stanley Street Gallery in Darlinghurst to view a thought provoking and emotional exhibition by 702 ABC Sydney multi-media journalist John Donegan.

‘Fighting Fire with Fire’ documents the 2013 Blue Mountains bushfires. John spent a week with the crews defending the Faulconbridge area and recorded this portrait of the volunteers fighting these devastating and ravaging fires.

The exhibition runs from 26th Feb – 15th March. The Gallery hours are 11-6pm Wed to Saturday.

The other exhibition I’ll be checking out today is at the Justice & Police MuseumCnr Albert & Phillip Sts, Circular Quay.

‘Suburban Noir’ is an exhibition highlighting crime scenes in Sydney during the 1950’s and 60’s. Watch the video below, it’s a definite ‘not to miss’ exhibition. The museum is open today from 10am to 5pm and this exhibition runs through to April (weekends only.)

The museum is also holding two other exhibitions: don’t miss ‘City of Shadows’ and ‘Collision:misadventure by motorcar’ – these two fabulous exhibitions highlight crime and misconduct on the streets of Sydney from days gone bye.

Have a wonderful day

Happy clicking

Chris

Shackleton – the documentary of one of the greatest journeys of all time

Sir-Ernest-Shackleton
Sir Ernest Shackleton

OH MY GOD…

I’ve just finished watching Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure – a documentary film of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s now-legendary 1914-1916 British Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. He wanted to be the first man to cross the Antarctic continent on foot.

He never fulfilled this dream. What he did do though was embed his name forever into the history books.

Through sheer perseverance and a determination that made him unique, he and his crew experienced conditions that any man would shy away from.

He watched his beloved ship ‘Endurance’ be crushed by ice, camped on ice floes under horrific conditions, spent many days at sea in life boats with his crew, and perhaps the most incredible part of this journey, he and 5 other men rowed 800 miles from Elephant Island to South Georgia.

This is the part I can’t believe. They rowed in the lifeboat, the James Caird, across the worlds most dangerous ocean, experienced gale force winds, treacherous seas and freezing, wet conditions.

All with the hope and belief that he could accomplish this formidable task.

They eventually made it to South Georgia. They unfortunately landed on the opposite side to the whaling station, so Shackleton and two others walked the 30 miles across South Georgia, with leather boots, 2 compasses, an axe and an old rope. They walked non-stop for 36 hours over dangerous crevasses, formidable peaks and complicated land. They eventually reached their destination – an unbelievable feat.

This is a story of courage, perseverance, hope and the human spirit. This heroic adventurer had eternal optimism, unequalled leadership qualities and believed anything could be accomplished. This caring gentle man nurtured his crew like they were his own family.

This really is one of the greatest journeys of all time….watch this film (click on the link below) and please let me know what you think of the film in the comments below.

Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure

Radio interview with 702 about our adventures in the Antarctic…listen here…

Well, I spent three hours listening to Dom Knights show on 702 abc radio…It was a great show, but unfortunately they didn’t air our interview 😦

However if you’d like to listen to the post then head over to abc’s page where you can read the story, view some of the pics and listen to the interview (click on the audio link next to the story)

http://www.abc.net.au/local/photos/2013/06/20/3786165.htm?site=sydney

have a wonderful weekend everyone….

 

Wow…I’ve been interviewed on 702 abc radio….read on….

Its been a fantastic week. And Im buzzing.

Lots of interest in Frozen Lenses, my Antarctic exhibition that’s showing at Societe Food and Wine Bar in conjunction with Carol D’Amici Photography.

And lots and lots of sales 🙂 Thats gonna make any photographer happy 🙂

Last week I had a call from John Donegan, an experienced photo journalist from 702 abc radio.

“Is this Chris Bernasconi?. This is John Donegan from 702 radio. I’d like to do a radio interview with you and Carol D’Amici about your Antarctic exhibition Frozen Lenses. Will that be okay?”

“Ummmm….Yeah” THAT WOULD BE GREAT!!

We met him on Wednesday at Societe Food and Wine Bar. I immediately recognised him. Im not sure where I’ve seen him, or where I’ve heard him speak, but I instantly felt at ease in his presence.

He relaxed both of us immediately and within a few minutes our interview was being recorded.

“How was the trip” he asked….Hmmm….well, awe inspiring, life changing, spectacular, breath taking, unbelievable, surreal and sensational.

There really aren’t too many words in the English language to describe how I felt whilst I travelled to the Antarctic.

This world at the bottom of our world is awe inspiring. I’ve come home more of a greenie than I’ve ever been and am dedicated to protecting this fragile environment.

I hope everyone who views our images will be moved enough to take action to protect this amazing part of our planet.

John asked Carol and I many questions. He made us laugh, and I realised quickly how strong the bond is that Carol and I have developed because of our Antarctic adventure.

We shared  a unique journey that not too many people on this planet have had the chance to experience. That has connected us forever. We laughed and recounted all of the wonderful highlights of our trip and answered John’s questions with passion and intensity.

All too quickly it was over. A quick photograph by him and then he was gone.

Tomorrow night – Friday 21st June – during “Evenings with Dominic Knight” on 702 DIGITAL radio, between 7pm-10pm, our interview will be aired. 

I love everything about 702 radio and feel honoured that our exhibition will be the point of discussion this Friday night.

Our story will also be on the 702 website. 🙂

I will let you know the time of the broadcast tomorrow….so stay tuned.

Thanks John for your professionalism and the chance to tell our story. It was a real pleasure to meet you.

Our exhibition, Frozen Lenses, is open all weekend at Societe Food and Wine Bar.  Carol and I will be there most of the weekend. So if you wanna check out our pics, or our maps (you’ll love them) or just have a chat about the Antarctic, drop in and say hello.

 

 

Frank Hurley – how tenacious and valiant you were….

I spent part of this weekend ‘gallery minding’ my photography exhibition, FROZEN LENSES – a photographic journey to the Antarctic.

I spoke to lots of people, showed them maps, talked about photos and described myself as a ‘passionate photographer.’

Later on in the afternoon I had the chance to do some reading – a book I’ve recently acquired called ‘The Heart of the Great Alone  – Scott, Shackleton and Antarctic Photography’ by David Hempleman-Adams, Sophie Gordon and Emma Stuart.

This book is beautiful. The photographs are stunning. As I was reading I came across a couple of pages dedicated to Frank Hurley – the Australian photographer who (amongst other journeys) accompanied Shackleton on the Imperial Transantarctic

Expedition 1914-1917. Hurley was hired to accompany Shackleton and his men who were attempting to cross the Antarctic continent on foot (1800 miles.) His job was to document the journey and secure photographic evidence of the trip.

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Frank Hurley, photographer unknown.

In Buenos Aires on the 12th October 1914 Hurley set sail aboard the Endurance with Shackleton and his crew. He  commenced photographing them and working life aboard the ship.

So far, this is like any other photographer. Being passionate about the job at hand, I can totally relate to this.

What happens next though in this story is ABOVE AND BEYOND.

The ‘Endurance’, on its maiden voyage was built to crush through pack ice. After five months the expedition reached the freezing Weddell Sea and were within sight of land when the Endurance became trapped in the freezing ice. Nine months later, the ship was finally crushed, leaving the crew stranded on drifting ice floes in the unforgiving Antarctic.

Hurley photographed in adverse conditions that were unimaginable. With temperatures as low as -25 degrees Celcius, he continued his photography until the ship was finally destroyed by the ice. His darkroom was the ship’s walk in refridgerator.

Cold and then more cold.

His determination and commitment to his craft were unflinching and above his personal safety. During the final disintregation of the the ship, Hurley spent almost three days out on the ice, not wanting to miss one moment of the final peril of the vessel.

He had salvaged most of his glass plates and camera equipment from the wreck, but on November 2nd 1915 he wanted to retrieve the film canisters and negatives.

In Argonauts of the South (1925), Hurley wrote:

“We hacked our way through the splintered timbers and , after vainly fishing in the ice-laiden waters with boathooks, I made up my mind to dive in after them. It was mighty cold work groping about in the mushy ice in semi-darkness of the ship’s bowels, but I was rewarded in the end and passed out the three precious tins.”

Now read that again. He dived down into the FREEZING ANTARCTIC WATERS to retrieve canisters of film to be developed to show the world his photographs?

WOW.

I understand doing whatever it takes to get the shot and preserving it for all to see, but honestly, Hurley’s story shows commitment that far surpasses many ordinary photographers.

A great deal of money had been advanced to the expedition against the rights to the films and photographs and it was well known how valuable these photographs were to pay for the cost of the expedition.

Hurley and Shackleton had the agonising task of deciding which 120 plates to keep and destroying the remaining 400 plates. This was necessary to reduce the weight of the equipment the men would have to carry across the ice.

This would be truly heart wrenching. As a photographer, I know how personally attached I am to each and every photograph. A huge amount of energy is expended taking each pic and to have to decide which ones to destroy would be an incomprehensible task.

Take a look at this shot of me (the girl in sitting down in the cream hat) photographing in the Antarctic earlier this year. Hurley and I share the same passion for photography, but I live in such different times.

I wonder what Frank Hurley would say if he saw this photo of me sitting comfortably in a zodiac, using a high end DSLR camera and lens, dressed in contemporary polar clothing?

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I am in awe of a courageous human being like Frank Hurley. What a true inspiration.

If you would like to enjoy some of these fantastic photographs, you can obtain a copy of this beautiful book here.

Hempleman-Adams David, Gordon Sophie, Stuart Emma. ( ) The Heart of the Great Alone  – Scott, Shackleton and Antarctic Photography, United Kingdom: Royal Collection Enterprises,pages 60-62

Who’s that Photographer? Check out my first podcast…

It all started a few months ago when I saw a tweet by an English photographer Stephen Cotterell.

He wanted to produce a podcast on an Australian Photographer whilst he was visiting Sydney in July.

I quickly said ‘yes’ and looked forward to chatting with a fellow photographer.

When I met him, it was like we had known each other for years 🙂

I really enjoyed recording the podcast. He has a really relaxed style and makes the questions up as he goes along!

We talked all things photography for hours….

He then shot a portrait of me, that I absolutely love, thank you so much Stephen 🙂

So, if you’d like to know a bit more about me and my photography click here….Christine Bernasconi Podcast.

Stephen also has many other featured photographers on iTunes, so if your interested please subscribe to his itunes channel.

You can view more of his fantastic portraits at www.stephencotterell.com

If  you have any questions about photography – I’d really love to hear them – please use the comments area below or connect with me on Facebook  or  twitter  .

Photo courtesy of © Stephen Cotterell Photography