It doesn’t get any better than this….Sydney Opera House

Hi everyone,

It’s been quite a while since I’ve written a post. Life has been so, so busy. My husband and I have had a sea change! We’ve moved out of Sydney down to the Illawarra and are living right by the sea!! It is quite simply, the best thing we’ve ever done 🙂

On Tuesday I was up in Sydney conducting a night photography tour and took this black and white photo of the Opera House and city from Kirribilli on the northern side of the Harbour.

I stood and stared at this scene before I took the shot. The Opera House gets me every time – especially at night – it is just such an architectural masterpiece:)

For those of you who are photographers – this shot was taken on my new Canon 5d Mark IV and the 24-105mm L series lens. The settings were ISO 400, F18, 25 sec.

What do you think of the shot in black and white? I’d love to hear your comments below:)

Click on the photo for a larger version.

Until next time,

Chris 🙂

 

Early morning photography at Mahon Pool, Maroubra

I love getting out and about with my camera and particularly enjoy starting the day early, photographing a sunrise 🙂

Last Saturday we discovered a brilliant spot for photography – Mahon Pool, Maroubra Beach Sydney.

The first part of the morning I used my ND {neutral density} filters to create slow shutter speeds and movement blur in my photos….I love the effect the slow shutter has on the water – each photo is so individual…the swirling water looks like mist and gives the image an ethereal look.

So, what is a neutral density filter and what does it do?

As you all know {well I’m hoping you do} to SLOW DOWN YOUR SHUTTER SPEED you need low light….
So at dawn, dusk or night time, it’s easy….
But during the day {when the sun is shining :)} even if you set your camera to a small aperture {like f20} and your ISO way down to 100….sometimes the shutter speed is STILL NOT SLOW ENOUGH to record movement and blur within a photograph.

So, in comes the neutral density filter {ND FILTER.}

There are several different types of ND filter on the market. Circular threaded screw-on ND filters are the simplest to use, but have the disadvantage that stacking them together soon leads to vignetting issues.

A more recent innovation are variable Neutral Density filters, which screw onto the lens but have an adjustable outer ring, which you rotate to adjust the density depending on the light conditions and the effect you want.

12744294_10207544031452217_6960606575193806170_n

Variable Neutral Density Filter

Slot-in filters require you to first attach a filter holder to your lens via a ring adapter {the same size as the diameter of your lens – in my case – 77mm}, then insert square or oblong filters into the holder – the chief advantage is that, once set up, it’s easy to swap filters, stack them or add different kinds of filters to the mix. Slot-in filters are usually the most expensive option when purchasing ND filters.

Here’s my Lee slot-in filter set up below.

IMG_3222

Lee adaptor and holder attached to the front of the lens

IMG_3223

Lee .9 ND filter inserted into holder.

It’s SUPER easy to use the slot-in ND filter system.

I have 4 filters –

.3  – reduces the s/speed by 1 stop.

.6 – reduces the s/speed by stops.

.9 – reduces the s/speed by 3 stops.

‘The little Stopper’ – reduces the s/speed by 6 stops.

12705255_10207518676218352_2345139700898032779_n

So, how do they work?

Lets say you meter a scene at f22 and the s/speed is 1/250 sec in Manual mode.

Now, insert the .3  {1 stop} ND filter into the holder on the front of the lens. Roll the shutter speed dial till the exposure level indicator meets in the middle. The s/speed will now be 1/125 sec – 1 stop slower than 1/250 sec.

Remove the .3 filter from the holder.

Now insert the .6 {2 stop} ND filter. Roll the shutter speed dial till the exposure level indicator meets in the middle. The s/speed will now be 1/60 sec – 2 stops slower than 1/250 sec.

Remove the .6 filter from the holder.

Now insert the .9 {3 stop} ND filter. Roll the shutter speed dial till the exposure level indicator meets in the middle. The s/speed will now be 1/30 sec – 3 stops slower than 1/250 sec.

Remove the .9 filter from the holder.

See how it works? You can also stack the filters in front of one another in the holder – eg
I could insert the .3, .6 & .9 filters into the holder and reduce the shutter speed by 6 stops -{1 +2+3 = 6 stops.}

Another really cool thing about ND filters is that they enhance the colours and will create more contrast in your image.

So, experiment with ND filters and different shutter speeds to achieve some really cool effects in your images:)

Click on each pic to view as large image…..

The second half of our shoot I experimented with FAST and SUPER FAST shutter speeds. Using the Canon 70-200mm zoom lens in AV mode, I raised the ISO to 640 and varied the aperture from f5 to f7.1. The shutter speeds ranged from 1/800 second up to 1/5000 sec. Don’t you just love the frozen action of the waves?

Click on each pic to view as large image…..

If you have any questions about ND filters, please email me at bernasconiphotography@gmail.com

Chris 🙂

P.S If you would like to connect with me on Instagram – click here, Facebook – click here & Twitter – click here.

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn really is SO, SO beautiful…check out these pics from the Southern Highlands of NSW

Getting out and about with my camera is one of my favourite things…

Last weekend, the Southern Highlands Botanical Gardens hosted the ‘Autumn Open Gardens’ weekend…

We visited the area last Sunday and for me, it totally nourished my soul and had me clicking like crazy 🙂

The first garden we visited at Bowral was ‘Bellagio’…WOW…who lives like that? They had a lake, an outdoor kitchen that looked like my indoor kitchen and two waterfalls…unbelievable!!

We also visited three other gardens in the rain and practised ‘what to do’ when the rain falls in relation to photography….hmmm…that was interesting 🙂

During the rain especially, we practised ‘macro’ photography…It is SO technical and had all of us on our toes…

Macro is an area of photography that I particularly love…as you focus on a ‘small’ area of a scene…lots of new ‘subjects’ come to light…..

Flowers, plants, statues and garden beds were all photographed..

Enjoy the pics..

Click on the first pic to start the slideshow….

 

Macro photography OR how to see the ‘little’ things….

Macro photography opens up a whole new way of seeing….In fact it really teaches you to ‘see’ and ‘take notice’ of what’s around you.

Last week, I spent the day at Fagan Park in Sydney’s north west going crazy with my macro lens.

The park was huge and had many different ‘themed’ areas within that gave numerous photographic opportunities.

There were also some gorgeous landscape scenes in the Park – if you live in Sydney, I would really recommend visiting this wonderful place.

Take a look at what I created…. 🙂

Click on the first pic to view the slideshow 🙂

 

Angel Place Sydney…or photographs of birdcages :)

Angel Place is a lane way that runs between George & Pitt Street Sydney.

Over the years it has been decorated with various ‘art forms’ and these ‘birdcages’ have been there for a while…

Last week I was in the city, so I thought it was time I checked out ‘Angel Place’ with my camera 🙂

Enjoy the pics 🙂 {click on the first photo to start the slideshow.}

 

How to resize your images quickly and easily using picmonkey.com

Are you frustrated with trying to send large photographs?

Emailing them to friends is a nightmare. You have to send one or two images at a time and it takes forever 🙂

Check out my screencast below. This is a quick and easy method using picmonkey.com

Please leave your comments or questions below.

Jagged Edge – a pic from the Antarctic

A couple of weekends ago i met a woman, Margret, who wanted to buy one of my images from my exhibition, Frozen Lenses.

Today I delivered that image to her and as well as having an early lunch with her and a glass of wine (at 11am) I learnt a lot about perception.

Without her knowing the name of the image, this is what she told me it meant to her.

“From the original grandiose shape I can see the beauty evolving and how years of living leaves characteristic marks. In the deterioration process the wild jagged edges look like the deep folds in an old persons face or body”

What a beautiful way to describe my image. She told me those words were a reflection of how she felt about herself. I can’t believe she used the words ‘jagged edge’ – that is what I named my image within minutes of shooting it.

I told her I had a completely different slant on it.

“I spotted this iceberg from far away, it looked wild, yet alone and incomplete. As we approached it I saw the beauty and imperfection in its shape. It totally reminded me of me – wild with jagged edges.

What are your thoughts on this image? I’d love to hear them. Please leave your comments below.

Enjoy my image – Jagged Edge.Jagged Edge